Rugrats in Paris: The Movie




Rugrats in Paris: The Movie is a 2000 animated comedy film based on the Nickelodeon animated television series Rugrats and the second film in the series.[4] This film marks the first appearance of Kimi Watanabe and her mother, Kira. The film also marks the appearance of the first significant villains in the Rugrats franchise, the child-hating Coco LaBouche and her accomplice, Jean-Claude. The events of the film take place before the series' seventh season.

The film was released in the United States on November 17, 2000, almost two years after the release of The Rugrats Movie in 1998.[3] Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was the best-reviewed film in the series from critics and fans alike and grossed over $103 million worldwide against a production budget of $30 million.

At the wedding reception of Lou Pickles and his new wife Lulu, a mother-child dance during the reception saddens Chuckie Finster and his father Chas, as Mrs. Finster died of a terminal illness shortly after Chuckie was born.

Tommy Pickles' father Stu is summoned to EuroReptarland, a Japanese amusement park in Paris, France, to fix a malfunctioning Reptar robot meant to star in a stage show. Due to Stu being called during the night because of the time difference, he mistakenly brings his wife Didi, his dog Spike, his sons Tommy and Dil, and Chuckie, Phil, Lil, Angelica, and their parents along to Paris to visit the park.

The group arrives at EuroReptarland, and Angelica overhears a phone conversation between the park's greedy, child-hating head Coco LaBouche, and the president of the Reptar franchise, Mr. Yamaguchi. Coco wants to be named Yamaguchi's successor, but Yamaguchi says his successor must love children. Coco therefore lies, and says she is engaged to a man with a child. She later discovers Angelica overheard; to save herself, Angelica reveals that Chas is looking for a second wife.

Coco strikes up a relationship with Chas, but her attempts to bond with a suspicious Chuckie fail. The adults and babies meet Coco's overworked but kind-hearted assistant Kira Watanabe and her daughter Kimi, who hail from Japan. Kira reluctantly helps Coco to win Chas' affections. Meanwhile, Spike gets lost in the streets of Paris and falls in love with a stray poodle named Fifi.

Kira tells the babies the origins of Reptar, explaining he was a feared monster until a princess revealed his gentler side to make the frightened humans like him. Chuckie decides the princess should be his new mother. He and his friends attempt to reach an animatronic replica of the princess in the park, but they are stopped by Coco's security team. At the Reptar show's premiere, Angelica informs Coco of Chuckie's wish. Coco sneaks onto the stage and takes the spotlight disguised as the princess, luring Chuckie into her arms and taking his teddy bear. Chuckie is horrified to discover the truth, but Chas is ecstatic and instantly decides to marry her.

On her wedding day, Coco has her accomplice, Jean-Claude, kidnap the babies and Angelica to prevent them from ruining her plans. He locks them in the warehouse where the show's robots are kept. Kira protests and threatens to reveal Coco's plan to Chas, but Coco throws her out of the taxi they are in, leaving Kira to hurry to the wedding via bicycle.

Chuckie apologizes for getting the babies into trouble, lamenting his lost mother. Angelica, feeling guilty, reveals her part in Coco's plan and also apologizes. Chuckie rallies the children to use the Reptar robot to hurry to Notre Dame to stop the wedding, picking up Kimi along the way. Jean-Claude follows, piloting Reptar's nemesis, Robosnail, until he is defeated when Chuckie knocks him into the Seine River.

The babies arrive at Notre Dame, interrupting the wedding just in time. Jean-Claude appears and inadvertently announces the kidnapping, and Chas calls off the wedding in disgust. Angelica divulges Coco's plan to Yamaguchi, who is also in attendance and fires Coco on the spot. When the babies inadvertently step on Coco's wedding dress, and she pulls it out from under them in front of everyone, Angelica tears the dress in retaliation, exposing Coco's undergarments. Coco storms out of the cathedral humiliated and defeated, while Spike chases Jean-Claude away. Kira arrives, returns Chuckie’s teddy bear to him, and apologizes to Chas for not revealing Coco's plan sooner. However, Chas admits that he was fooled by the romance of Paris and apologizes to Chuckie. He and Kira begin to fall in love after discovering a shared liking of the same poem.

Chas and Kira eventually get married after returning to the United States, while Fifi is adopted. After the new family takes their first dance together, the entire dance floor erupts into an all-out food fight instigated by the babies.

A soundtrack for the film, titled Rugrats in Paris: The Movie: Music From the Motion Picture, was released on November 7, 2000 on Maverick Records.[6] Like the last soundtrack, it also contains an enhanced part: the theme song to the film "Jazzy Rugrat Love" by Teena Marie.

The film was released on November 17, 2000 by Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies.

Paramount Home Entertainment released the film on VHS and DVD on March 27, 2001. In 2009, Paramount released the film via iTunes and the PlayStation Store.[7][8][9]

On August 29, 2017, Rugrats in Paris was re-released on DVD.

On Rotten Tomatoes the film holds an approval rating of 76% based on 74 reviews and an average rating of 6.29/10. The site's critical consensus read: "When the Rugrats go to Paris, the result is Nickelodeon-style fun. The plot is effectively character-driven, and features catchy songs and great celebrity voice-acting."[10] Metacritic gave a film a weighted average score of 62 out of 100 based, on 25 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[11] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A–" on an A+ to F scale.[12]

Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars, stating, "The point is, adults can attend this movie with a fair degree of pleasure. That's not always the case with movies for kids, as no parent needs to be reminded. There may even be some moms who insist that the kids need to see this movie. You know who you are."[13] Common Sense Media gave the film a three out of five stars, stating, "Eighty minutes of visual surprises, clever comedy."[14] Empire gave the film a three out of five stars, stating, "Just as good as the last outing, this is great kiddie fare with some filmic references for the adults."[15]

Plugged In wrote, "If parents are wanting more of what they see on the Rugrats TV show (plenty of potty humor, disrespectful language and zero discipline), then this movie lives up to expectations. Never is a child scolded for making a mess or reprimanded for being rude (of course, some of this is due to the fact that many of the characters aren’t old enough to talk and only communicate with each other). The movie is cleverly written—it actually has the ability to hold adults’ attention for longer than three minutes—but it’s not funny that chaos is the norm and children get to do whatever they want whenever they want. Neither is it appropriate for a children’s film to tip its hat to such R-rated flicks as The Godfather and A Few Good Men."[16]

The film grossed $76.5 million in North America and $26.8 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $103.3 million, against a $30 million budget.

In the United States, it opened at #2, grossing $22.7 million in its opening weekend for an average of $7,743 from 2,934 venues.[17][18] In the United Kingdom, it opened at #3, behind Bridget Jones's Diary and Spy Kids.[19]

A third and last installment, entitled Rugrats Go Wild, was released on June 13, 2003, featuring the characters from The Wild Thornberrys.

Rugrats in Paris: The Movie is a 2000 animated comedy film based on the Nickelodeon animated television series Rugrats and the second film in the series.[4] This film marks the first appearance of Kimi Watanabe and her mother, Kira. The film also marks the appearance of the first significant villains in the Rugrats franchise, the child-hating Coco LaBouche and her accomplice, Jean-Claude. The events of the film take place before the series' seventh season.

The film was released in the United States on November 17, 2000, almost two years after the release of The Rugrats Movie in 1998.[3] Rugrats in Paris: The Movie was the best-reviewed film in the series from critics and fans alike and grossed over $103 million worldwide against a production budget of $30 million.

At the wedding reception of Lou Pickles and his new wife Lulu, a mother-child dance during the reception saddens Chuckie Finster and his father Chas, as Mrs. Finster died of a terminal illness shortly after Chuckie was born.

Tommy Pickles' father Stu is summoned to EuroReptarland, a Japanese amusement park in Paris, France, to fix a malfunctioning Reptar robot meant to star in a stage show. Due to Stu being called during the night because of the time difference, he mistakenly brings his wife Didi, his dog Spike, his sons Tommy and Dil, and Chuckie, Phil, Lil, Angelica, and their parents along to Paris to visit the park.

The group arrives at EuroReptarland, and Angelica overhears a phone conversation between the park's greedy, child-hating head Coco LaBouche, and the president of the Reptar franchise, Mr. Yamaguchi. Coco wants to be named Yamaguchi's successor, but Yamaguchi says his successor must love children. Coco therefore lies, and says she is engaged to a man with a child. She later discovers Angelica overheard; to save herself, Angelica reveals that Chas is looking for a second wife.

Coco strikes up a relationship with Chas, but her attempts to bond with a suspicious Chuckie fail. The adults and babies meet Coco's overworked but kind-hearted assistant Kira Watanabe and her daughter Kimi, who hail from Japan. Kira reluctantly helps Coco to win Chas' affections. Meanwhile, Spike gets lost in the streets of Paris and falls in love with a stray poodle named Fifi.

Kira tells the babies the origins of Reptar, explaining he was a feared monster until a princess revealed his gentler side to make the frightened humans like him. Chuckie decides the princess should be his new mother. He and his friends attempt to reach an animatronic replica of the princess in the park, but they are stopped by Coco's security team. At the Reptar show's premiere, Angelica informs Coco of Chuckie's wish. Coco sneaks onto the stage and takes the spotlight disguised as the princess, luring Chuckie into her arms and taking his teddy bear. Chuckie is horrified to discover the truth, but Chas is ecstatic and instantly decides to marry her.

On her wedding day, Coco has her accomplice, Jean-Claude, kidnap the babies and Angelica to prevent them from ruining her plans. He locks them in the warehouse where the show's robots are kept. Kira protests and threatens to reveal Coco's plan to Chas, but Coco throws her out of the taxi they are in, leaving Kira to hurry to the wedding via bicycle.

Chuckie apologizes for getting the babies into trouble, lamenting his lost mother. Angelica, feeling guilty, reveals her part in Coco's plan and also apologizes. Chuckie rallies the children to use the Reptar robot to hurry to Notre Dame to stop the wedding, picking up Kimi along the way. Jean-Claude follows, piloting Reptar's nemesis, Robosnail, until he is defeated when Chuckie knocks him into the Seine River.

The babies arrive at Notre Dame, interrupting the wedding just in time. Jean-Claude appears and inadvertently announces the kidnapping, and Chas calls off the wedding in disgust. Angelica divulges Coco's plan to Yamaguchi, who is also in attendance and fires Coco on the spot. When the babies inadvertently step on Coco's wedding dress, and she pulls it out from under them in front of everyone, Angelica tears the dress in retaliation, exposing Coco's undergarments. Coco storms out of the cathedral humiliated and defeated, while Spike chases Jean-Claude away. Kira arrives, returns Chuckie’s teddy bear to him, and apologizes to Chas for not revealing Coco's plan sooner. However, Chas admits that he was fooled by the romance of Paris and apologizes to Chuckie. He and Kira begin to fall in love after discovering a shared liking of the same poem.

Chas and Kira eventually get married after returning to the United States, while Fifi is adopted. After the new family takes their first dance together, the entire dance floor erupts into an all-out food fight instigated by the babies.

A soundtrack for the film, titled Rugrats in Paris: The Movie: Music From the Motion Picture, was released on November 7, 2000 on Maverick Records.[6] Like the last soundtrack, it also contains an enhanced part: the theme song to the film "Jazzy Rugrat Love" by Teena Marie.

The film was released on November 17, 2000 by Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies.

Paramount Home Entertainment released the film on VHS and DVD on March 27, 2001. In 2009, Paramount released the film via iTunes and the PlayStation Store.[7][8][9]

On August 29, 2017, Rugrats in Paris was re-released on DVD.

On Rotten Tomatoes the film holds an approval rating of 76% based on 74 reviews and an average rating of 6.29/10. The site's critical consensus read: "When the Rugrats go to Paris, the result is Nickelodeon-style fun. The plot is effectively character-driven, and features catchy songs and great celebrity voice-acting."[10] Metacritic gave a film a weighted average score of 62 out of 100 based, on 25 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[11] Audiences polled by CinemaScore gave the film an average grade of "A–" on an A+ to F scale.[12]

Roger Ebert gave the film three out of four stars, stating, "The point is, adults can attend this movie with a fair degree of pleasure. That's not always the case with movies for kids, as no parent needs to be reminded. There may even be some moms who insist that the kids need to see this movie. You know who you are."[13] Common Sense Media gave the film a three out of five stars, stating, "Eighty minutes of visual surprises, clever comedy."[14] Empire gave the film a three out of five stars, stating, "Just as good as the last outing, this is great kiddie fare with some filmic references for the adults."[15]

Plugged In wrote, "If parents are wanting more of what they see on the Rugrats TV show (plenty of potty humor, disrespectful language and zero discipline), then this movie lives up to expectations. Never is a child scolded for making a mess or reprimanded for being rude (of course, some of this is due to the fact that many of the characters aren’t old enough to talk and only communicate with each other). The movie is cleverly written—it actually has the ability to hold adults’ attention for longer than three minutes—but it’s not funny that chaos is the norm and children get to do whatever they want whenever they want. Neither is it appropriate for a children’s film to tip its hat to such R-rated flicks as The Godfather and A Few Good Men."[16]

The film grossed $76.5 million in North America and $26.8 million in other territories for a worldwide total of $103.3 million, against a $30 million budget.

In the United States, it opened at #2, grossing $22.7 million in its opening weekend for an average of $7,743 from 2,934 venues.[17][18] In the United Kingdom, it opened at #3, behind Bridget Jones's Diary and Spy Kids.[19]

A third and last installment, entitled Rugrats Go Wild, was released on June 13, 2003, featuring the characters from The Wild Thornberrys.


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